Author Discussions and The End Of NanOWriMO

I’ve got so many novels and writing related projects to finish, and the urge to bounce back and forth between them is strong. Obviously I know that multitask writing won’t help me produce anything faster–that it’s best to stick to one project at a time–but I can’t help but want to jump into everything all at once.

Working on The Vermin Series is lots of fun. I’ve had the time to really bond with these characters, and watch them grow, learn and explore the world around them. It’s just that I’ve also got like 10 other projects that I’ve started, that I really, really want to get back into. Usually what I’ll do is work on another book or writing project while my novel is off with my editor. I find this allows me to build up the foundation of my other work, and develop my setting and characters while I’m waiting for feedback and corrections.

Still, there are days when it gets a little bit frustrating. I often think about those kid shows where the main character finds a way to clone themselves, and becomes more productive. On the other hand, those episodes always ended badly and the main character tends to realize that it’s not always best to get things done quickly, but rather get things done properly by having good time management skills.

Like a few days ago I spent the majority of my time scrolling through social media, versus reading and writing like I’d initially planned to do. While scrolling through twitter, one of my favourite authors was having a discussion thread, which ultimately lead to them explaining why it’s important to set a scheduled writing time during the day so that your family and friends are respectful of that time. Then they know that say from, 9-11 am you’re writing, and not to disturb you.

I honestly think that’s really smart. It’s important to respect peoples time, and their space…and setting that boundary early on, by creating a routine can not only help you with productivity but it also helps others take you more seriously when it comes to your work.

I’ve been writing for a long time, so my family knows that generally if they don’t hear me listening to music or watching Netflix, I’m most likely working on a manuscript or I’m reading. The same thing happens when I’m recording or auditioning, I always let them know in advance, and now it’s become a routine. They’re aware that I’m working and won’t disturb me during this time.

This practice of setting a schedule in order to create boundaries can be applied to all arts, and I personally feel that this author was correct in stating that these boundaries are often necessary for those in the arts to gain the respect of those closest to them. For as long as I can remember, my Dad would advise my siblings and I to treat certain things like a job. Set a time of day, and it becomes routine. Obviously, I will acknowledge that it isn’t always easy to create on a schedule, but people do it for NaNoWriMo every year, if you think about it?

I’ve learned by keeping track of when I write, that I tend to do a lot of work after lunchtime. Whenever I have a day off, I like to write as much as possible, regardless of the time of day. It’s on those days that the urge to work on one of my other projects grows stronger. I’m sure many people go through this. I just have so much fun creating new things, that I honestly can’t wait until I can jump into the next project. I also used to finish drafting novels within a month no problem, but as I’ve gotten older and had you know…bills and such, I’ve tried to find a good balance between all of these things. It’s not always easy, sometimes I get very busy, which I don’t mind, but it can feel like I’m juggling multiple things at once and occasionally I need to take a breather. I know everyone’s methods are different, and truthfully I’m probably not an expert at this sort of thing, but I do find that making a to-do-list helps when I’ve got a lot on my plate. I can cross things off as I go, and it kind of takes away a bit of the pressure once I’ve laid out everything that I need to complete.

I do this with my novels, and sometimes set deadlines for myself outside of my publishing deadlines. Sometimes I want to reach a certain point before I go back and edit something, or I want to spend a teeny bit of time fleshing out a character. Making a list helps me determine what needs to be done first, in order for me to move onto the next task.

Currently, I’ve been forcing myself to solely focus on Vermin, so that I can then have more time to put into my other writing projects and novels. I’m having lots of fun with it, but I have all these storylines I want to develop and explore…and I think it’s the whole development portion that is making me more eager to jump into these projects. Once I know exactly where I’m going with a project that urge seems to settle, and I feel more at ease. With The Vermin Series, I’m always like, “I gotta write this scene. Ooh! Wait what if I change this line here to this and then do this in here instead.” Which is a different sort of excitement, and I think there’s even more now that it’s being read and I’m hearing back from readers.

It’s exciting to be able to talk about my characters and to see people drawing them, and asking about certain scenes. I have to constantly remind myself that because other people are reading it, I need to zip my lip about certain characters and details, because I know that if I say the wrong thing it could spoil stuff, and I don’t want to do that.

If you follow me on social media, you already know that I reached 50k words a week early. overall I feel good about what I’ve written this month, and i cannot wait to share it.

If you haven’t already, you can grab a copy of Vermin from Amazon, or Indigo. currently the eBook is only available for kindle readers. There is also a dedicated TikTok account for the series @theverminseries, and the first chapter is available to listen to on YouTube!

Vermin: Chapter One, Audiobook

ABOUT THE SERIES: Left for dead at the side of the road in an outlawed town, Nicholas is rescued by a human girl. Plagued by fevered dreams and a lethal illness, Nicholas doesn’t know what to make of her kindness. If she knew what he was, death would be a merciful gift.

Vermin is a Young Adult, Paranormal Urban Fantasy, Romance series by Canadian voice actress Ardin Patterson.

Available at Indigo & Amazon:

Currently there is no official audiobook for this series, this is merely a sample featuring the first chapter of the novel.

NANoWriMo Update

I’ve been having a lot of fun with NaNoWriMo this year, despite being on the fence about whether or not I’d partake…however, I’m not really aiming to reach a specific word count but instead to complete the ending of Vermin’s sequel. I’m very far along, and have been making an effort to write everyday.

The Vermin Series (along with myself) are now on TikTok, as a large chunk of the readers are use Bookstagram, BookTwitter and BookTok, we thought it would be best to have updates about the series on all three. I’ll try to make the content as fun and engaging as possible.

I just finished writing one of my favourite scenes in book two so far. I’ll try not to give away any spoilers, but the scene follows one of Nicholas’ siblings. For those who haven’t finished or read the first book yet, I won’t say anything more. I’d hate to say something that might spoil it for you.

I’ve also been working on two other projects. One is voice over related, and I have been having an absolute blast recording! What I can tell you, is that it’s for a really cool children’s web series, and that I play two key roles. It also makes me feel like a little kid again, and reminds me of one of my favourite things to do in the summer with my family when I was small.

Well, I’d better get back to writing. Although slightly ambitious, I think I might be able to finish Vermin and start prepping another book that I was hoping to write in December. We’ll see how things go of course.

Here’s a little sneak peek at one of the chapters in book two:

Her image danced before him, bright and colourful like the inside of a kaleidoscope.

Vermin, Ardin Patterson

Author Q & A

Today I will be answering some questions about myself and my work! I pulled question prompts from the website: The John Fox.

What is the first book that made you cry?

The first book that made me cry was one of the books in the Camp Confidential series. It was when the character Priya got into a fight with her best friend Jordan. I haven’t read this series since the sixth grade, but I remember the scene vividly. The book that made me cry after that was The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.

Have you ever gotten reader’s block?

When I was in university I stopped reading novels for fun and only read what was on the syllabus…a lot of which was really dry. The entire time, I felt like I was being forced to read, and it was taking the fun out of one of my favourite hobbies.

I managed to rekindle my love of reading by reading more manga and graphic novels during university. These were my “books to read for fun” while the novels I was assigned for my classes continued to be my homework. Doing this prevented me from getting reader’s block, and I’ve been able to discover so many new favourite genres since graduating!

Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

Yes, and I did for a while with my poetry. I ended up publishing under my real name after I became a voice actress since it made sense to keep my work under the same name.

Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

I write whatever I want to read. That’s what got me into writing in the first place. When it comes to readers I just try to keep in mind the age group of my target audience, and the genre I’m writing in. Other than that, during the first draft I go wherever the story takes me.

What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

The majority of my friends who write are poets, song writers and journalists. I love their work and support them whenever I can. Having friends who are into the arts is nice because you can cheer one another on! It’s also great because sometimes they have valuable knowledge to share such as tips, or lessons they’ve learned along their own journey. After graduating however, I’ve gotten to know a lot of amazing authors of a variety of genres, and am always excited to see their work! I’ve also had opportunities to work with some of them whether it was their my voice over work, or by doing editing and beta reading on early drafts of their books.

Do you want each book to stand on its own, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

That depends on the book. I have some books that are series, and others that are stand-alone. I mostly do whatever the characters ask for…so if the story requires more room for the characters to grow, I’ll do a series. If the events and character growth take place in a short amount of time then it will usually end up being a single book.

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

Keep reading! Keep practicing! Keep having fun! But please, please go outside a little more. We need a tan.

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

I’m getting better at meeting the deadlines I set for myself. Prior to publishing I would create really loose deadlines, and would do my best to stick to them, mainly because I knew that eventually I would need to learn to work within that time frame. Now, I try to write every day and keep track of my progress for each project so that I can meet all of my deadlines on time.

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

A lot…like…I don’t even know anymore. Years ago I knew the exact number but now I can’t even remember. I can tell you that I’ve got about 3 projects on the go aside from The Vermin Series, that I’m super excited about.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

I spend a lot of time researching, mainly because I never stop. Before I begin a book, I’ll research whatever I think I need to know at that introductory point…usually this is just to help form the setting. Afterwards I will continue to research as I go and compile all of that information into notes.

How many hours a day do you write?

It depends on the day. I try to write for an hour minimum whenever I can. If I miss a day, I don’t stress over it and make it up later on.

What did you edit out of this book?

There were a few scenes and some dialogue that was taken out. There was also a bunch of stuff that was added, to help flesh things out more. Most of what was added was from the sequel, which now gives me more room to expand since it was introduced earlier in the series.

How do you select the names of your characters?

I really like names, and depending on the story the names of a character are significant. In The Vermin Series, I picked named based on the time period that the story takes place, however in the case of my characters surnames, I believe I came up with those while glancing around my room. A lot of the time I find that characters end up being named after streets in my neighbourhood, or after plants.

If you didn’t write, what would you do for work?

I’d either be a singer or an artist…which I already do but I’ve missed singing for an audience these past few years. I do get to sing for work though, when I’m voice acting so that’s always fun!

Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

Some of my books have secret inside jokes that are between my sister and I. Only she’d know what they are an I like that, because the jokes are usually really stupid and corny but they make us laugh.

What was your hardest scene to write?

I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but in book one the hardest scene for me to write was the one between Roland and his mother. I cried writing it, I cried editing it and I cry every time I read it.

Do you Google yourself?

Yes. I like to check the release dates of shows I’ve worked on and I find the fastest way is to look up my own name, mainly because it’s not popular.

What is your favorite childhood book?

This might be a long list…but if I had to pick Jerry Spinelli, Gordon Korman, Margaret Peterson Haddix and Judy Blume were my top authors. I also adored the Babysitter’s Club, Princess School and Camp Confidential Series.

Does your family support your career as a writer?

Yes, 100%. I’m extremely grateful and fortunate to have a family that supports all of my creative endeavors. It can make such a huge difference when you have the support of those closest to you.

Want to learn more about Vermin and where you can grab a copy? Check out the link above!

Vermin Featured by The Literary Coven & The Steam Reader

Vermin was featured in a post by The Literary Coven on VK, you can check it out here.

Book release dates for August on VK

I like that their list included little ice cream emojis. I thought that was really cute.

Vermin was also featured on The Steam Reader, which is a romance book blog, under their August 2021 Romance releases.

My book has been out for a month and I’m still processing that it’s out in the world. I’ve seen people sharing it on Instagram as well, which is really cool.

I’m excited for the sequel to come out, and am so happy that I’ve been able to share this story with you. Thank you again for your support.

Reviewer Calls Vermin, “Touching and Beautiful.”

I was so ecstatic to hear that Vermin’s received another great review! I took a screen shot of it with my phone earlier to share on my Instagram story, but I also thought I’d share it here on my blog!

Touching and Beautiful

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Ardin Patterson is a gifted author and storyteller. I say both because being a great author does not always mean that the audience will be focused on every word, or invested in the characters. I don’t think I skipped a single passage, I was so worried about Nicholas, Rose, Diana, Roland, Zanna and Micha.

The author does an excellent job of portraying deep, flawed beings who love and (in some cases) hate in equal measure. These people (like us in real life) are so easily swayed to cruelty as long as they feel justified, but in the same moment, they will show compassion. I am invested in what will happen next. I want the best for Nicholas and Rose. Their blossoming romance is sweet and true, but I don’t trust those villagers.

-Liz

Thank you so much to everyone who has read the novel, and taken the time to read reviews or reach out to me personally. Your words are so encouraging and I’m so glad that you’ve come to love my characters as much as I do.

Thank you so much again! Your words are greatly appreciated, and mean so much to me.


You can order a copy of Vermin from either Indigo or Amazon:

Vermin Receives a 5 Star Review on Amazon

I was just informed that Vermin has received a 5 star review on Amazon! I’m so pleased to hear that readers are enjoying the book. I decided to go check out the review and share it here:

This is not my genre but a teen recommended this book and being twice her age I decided to humor her. I picked it up and kept turning the pages LOL ! For some reason the vibe, feel , moral message and images that it invokes for me are a combination of Avatar, twilight and Harry Potter, I suppose you have to read it to see what I mean. Main message makes you think about how you treat others who may look different or may very well be different. Good read, enjoy !

Amazon Reviewer

I’m very happy that readers are recommending my novel to others! The feedback and reviews are very sweet, and encouraging.

Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a review! It means so much!

Isn’t the bunny cute? It reminds me of Miffy…at least that’s what I think she’s called. It was a book/show I used to like when I was little, so if I got her name wrong I apologize.

Thank you again for your kind words and support!

Chatting with a Reader About Vermin

The other day I had the opportunity to speak to a young reader, who had just finished Vermin in a day and a half! It was such a cool experience, getting to talk to someone about my book, and hearing all of their thoughts about the story and characters.

What really resonated with me from our conversation, was how much they took away from the story. They discussed how much they enjoyed the deeper meanings within the story, what certain characters symbolized, and were pleased to see these messages being presented in a way that kids their age and younger could understand.

I won’t give any major spoilers here, because I know many folks who are just starting the book, or who are only part way through, but it they definitely hit the nail on the head with their interpretation.

During our discussion, I confessed that when I’d initially begun writing Vermin, I was still in high school and that one of the main takeaways from the story was put in there subconsciously. It wasn’t until I was reviewing the early draft of those first chapters in university, that it dawned on me. What I didn’t tell them, was that at the time I’d started writing Vermin, I had been experiencing some of what my character Nicholas and his siblings were going through. As a teenager I found it difficult to talk about these things, so I wrote about them in hopes that I could try and understand for myself, why I was being mistreated by some of my peers. It wasn’t until I began editing the first book in the series, that I realized what I had written.

As I mentioned earlier, I’m being vague about what themes this young lady pulled from the book because I’d like to give others a chance to discover it for themselves. I guess after studying English Lit’ in school all those years, I’ve become a bit sentimental about ones own interpretation. I think that, a personal takeaway from a story is much more impactful than being told what one should have gotten from the text.

I do again, want to thank the people who arranged for me to have that discussion with this young reader. It was my first time discussing my writing outside of a peer review group, and it honestly made my whole day. I’m glad that Vermin had that much of an impact on someone, and I hope that it will have that effect on other readers as well.


Want to find out more about Vermin, or are looking to purchase a copy for yourself? Click one of the buttons below, to be directed to Goodreads or Amazon.

Vermin Gets a 4 Star Rating on Goodreads

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

I’m so happy that readers are enjoying Vermin! I’ve been hearing lots of positive feedback so far, and was absolutely thrilled to find out Vermin received it’s first rating!

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read and review my novel!

If you’re looking to get a copy, you can click the links below which will lead you to the paperback or eBook.